​FROM THE LATEST OTH

The Public Needs Saving, Not the Humanities

by Stephen Groening

Public humanities projects often mean work produced by intellectuals working within the university system aimed at those outside of the university system.  In this way, the public humanities—as phrase and as project—suggests that the humanities are in the academy, while the public is out there somewhere on the streets, in their homes, or in the workplace. A corollary to this proposition is that academic outputs are too esoteric, too jargon-filled and too difficult for everyday folks.  Thus humanities scholarship must be made more accessible, not just in terms of appearing in places outside the university classrooms and libraries but accessible in the sense that little beyond high school training is necessary to comprehend it.

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Remembering the German Democratic Republic through the Open Memory Box Project

by Lawrence Davis

Western European and American governments have generally characterized the GDR only in terms of its totalitarian characteristics: a one-party communist state; a secret police (known as the Stasi) that made surveillance of the population into a terrifying art form; and the political and military (and to some extent, cultural) domination by the Soviet Union. Certainly, this is one way to look at the forty-five-year existence of the GDR. But what if that was only half of the story?

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Response to “Using Outreach Weeks to Examine Labor, Assessment and Value in Open Advocacy”

by Elizabeth Beaver Batte

This article is specifically geared towards those who work on open access advocacy initiatives and encourages them to take a step back to evaluate their labor in outreach weeks. For those of us in library science, outreach weeks are very common for almost every specialty of librarianship. That can include archives, K-12 literacy, national library week, museums or others. Success is often measured by attendance but not the actual labor put into the events during outreach weeks. The outreach week the authors chose to focus on was Open Access (OA) week

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Response to “Using Outreach Weeks to Examine Labor, Assessment and Value in Open Advocacy”

by Precious McKenzie

Without vibrant humanities and arts programs, what will American society look like in the years to come? The humanities teach us to read deeply and widely, to think critically about the multitude of dilemmas that we face. The humanities teach us to be creative, think creatively, solve complex problems. The disciplines teach us to question, to live ethically, to argue for human rights, to be an engaged citizen. Without the humanities, we are surely destined to become a vast population of serfs.

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